Tuesday, August 30, 2005

SENSORY BRANDING ... future mantra for marketers !!

Most marketing and brand building plans pivot around only two senses: sight and sound. However, according to Martin Lindstrom, “Though brand awareness is created, but it gets diluted compared to the rare brands that appeal to all five senses.” Lindstrom believes that more marketers need to take their brands’ imprints beyond the commonly used senses of sight and sound, and capitalise on the stronger impact that they can make the other senses.

Example:
Rolls-Royce has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to reproduce the smell of the classic 1965 Silver Cloud RR, and is spraying it into their cars to ensure that they smell like a ‘real’ Rolls-Royce.
Singapore Airlines: Target all five senses
Kellogs: Emphasis on the sound of chips
Marriott: Smell

Indian Population: The Indian part of the Brand Sense study done by market research agency Millward Brown shows that Indians have over 20per cent more sensory sensitiveness.

In Asia, major hotel chains, airline companies, clothing stores, restaurant chains, theme parks, fashion lines and mobile phone brands have implemented the concept of sensory branding with major success. The same is the case for Indian brands. Indians, in fact, are very open towards the sensory way of thinking as they feel it enhances the quality perception of using brands.

Comment on the above with examples from different industries where sensory branding has led to ROI?

13 Comments:

Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Low Sales on Internet: Because there is less focus on senses which finally trigger sales.

But in recent past we seen internet marketers simulating a real time environment by focusing on few of the 5 senses.

Idea: When users open coke website, there should be a sound of fizz.

August 30, 2005 5:02 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

A strong visual and sensory identity is the most important element of brand differentiation. The design of your website can play an important role in this effect. A good design can truly manifest the personality of the brand and set it apart from the crowd. Designing a website for visual clarity and uniqueness will enhance your customer experience, increase buying intent, and create memorabilia.

August 30, 2005 5:11 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

What about if the consumer were blindfolded?

Coke Example: When the Coke bottle was being designed in 1915, the brief was simple. The bottle should be distinctive enough to be recognised by touch — even in the dark, and if broken, its pieces should be recognisable as part of the whole. The outcome — the classic curved Coke bottle — is still used in markets the world over, and has been passing the smash test for almost 90 years now.

August 30, 2005 5:13 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Singapore Airlines patented a distinct aroma that permeates its entire fleet, is included in flight attendants’ perfumes, and is blended into hot towels served before takeoff.
Cadillac, Ford and Chrysler cars have their respective single, specific branded aromas.

August 30, 2005 5:14 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Kellogg actually created the ‘Snap, Crackle and Pop’ sound that its Rice Crispies brand uses as a slogan in its sound labs — it “owns” that sound just as much as it owns the recipe and the company logo — and the expression is trademarked.

August 30, 2005 5:14 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Nice Fact: 75% of all the emotions we experience on a daily basis are, in fact, generated by what we smell

August 30, 2005 5:16 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Nike Research: We conducted a very interesting test with two identical pairs of Nike running shoes that were placed in separate but identical rooms. One room was infused with a mixed floral scent, too weak to be noticed. The other wasn’t. About 84% consumers showed a preference for the shoes displayed in the fragrant room, and were willing to pay, on an average, $10.33 more for that pair — and they couldn’t even explain why. This is the power of the branding technique that leverages the concept of sensory branding and involves all the five senses simultaneously.

August 30, 2005 5:16 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

CasinosAccording to a study conducted in Las Vegas, spraying a particular scent in casinos increased gambling revenue by 45%.

RestaurantsFurther, it has been possible to increase revenue by 29% by simply playing a certain type of music in restaurants.

August 30, 2005 5:18 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Galleries Lafayette in ParisIt was found that spraying a certain scent made people change their perception of time. Prior to the test, people claimed they spent around 45 minutes in the store, though the actual time spent was around 40 minutes. After spraying, consumer perception changed. They thought they’d spent only 25 minutes in the store, despite now spending an hour there.

August 30, 2005 5:20 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Hershey’s chocolate store in New York Times Square : Sprayed the smell of chocolate into the store as the chocolates themselves don’t smell — they are wrapped in plastic for hygienic reasons. They claim their sales climbed some 34%. So, it is possible to measure the loyalty factor, the satisfaction rate, the revenue increase, and some tests even show that people change their perception of the service and the staff — believing the service to be better or more professional just because of the smell and the music.

August 30, 2005 5:22 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Branding in India and Asia: The concept of sensory branding has been incredibly successful in Asian countries, as we’re much more sensitive towards our senses in Asia than in any other place in the world. In fact, the Japanese show 50% more sensory sensitiveness than Americans. The Indian part of the Brand Sense study done by market research agency Millward Brown shows that Indians have over 20% more sensory sensitiveness. In Asia, major hotel chains, airline companies, clothing stores, restaurant chains, theme parks, fashion lines and mobile phone brands have implemented the concept of sensory branding with major success. The same is the case for Indian brands. Indians, in fact, are very open towards the sensory way of thinking as they feel it enhances the quality perception of using brands.

August 30, 2005 5:24 PM  
Blogger Nitin Kochhar said...

Who will get benefitted? Almost every brand category would benefit. This includes banking, airlines, hospitality, food and beverage, entertainment, the computer industry, mobile phone industry, fashion, FMCG, automobiles and the service sector. In fact, it is estimated that by the end of 2008, 35% of all top Fortune 500 companies will adopt the concept of sensory branding.

August 30, 2005 5:26 PM  
Blogger C. Seshagiri said...

Brilliant work! I have gone through such an idea for the first time, and yes, i see it working. as a future manager, i see myself benefitting. in fact, from now on, i'm going to spray my room with a pleasant purfume and see the effect.hehe

September 01, 2005 5:24 PM  

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